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Guidance for applying
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I'm sure you want to know what I look for when curating a market. Firstly, I must say that I don't have an 'agenda'. I'm not a feminist or a vegan. I have no interest in politics or religion. Your own personal agenda will not influence my decision to accept or decline your application so please make sure your application is creation focused.

 

I actively support a number of animal welfare charities, mostly for dogs, but I see this as a personal thing and I don't link it to the market. You won't have to make a donation to charity or give a portion of your takings. Personally, I love animal art, vibrant colour and quirky acrylic jewellery. However, I curate for the audience not for myself. Visitors always comment that they love the range of stalls that attend the markets and that everything is good quality and noticeably handmade or from a small batch designer collection. 

The St Andrews Hall event has a demographic of around 65% women aged 35+. Many of them bring a male partner so it would be fantastic to expand the range of products for men we have on offer. The remaining audience are young people with an eclectic range of tastes. Many are students so I aim to have a range of items at all price points. Generally vendors with some 'pocket money' items alongside their main range tend to have more sales on the day as a lot of people will go away and think about making a high cost purchase. If you have a majority of items over £50 a method for taking credit card payments is a plus. We do get a number of trade buyers attending our shows. If you are considering selling wholesale it is a good idea to have thought about what that conversation might be like.

It is essential that everyone who applies to the market has their own public liability insurance. Anyone selling items for Children must show proof of relevant safety certificates. The same applies to soap and cosmetic products and candles will also need to be adequately labelled.

As the venues I use are so large there is usually room for artists and makers of most disciplines and styles. I don't judge you based on your social media following or lack thereof, but I do ask that you are able to use the internet proficiently enough to properly fill out the application form and reply to emails. Your photos are a crucial part of the application. I understand that we are makers, not photographers. However, being a one woman team, I am unable to spend hours editing your photos to get them to an acceptable standard to share on the makers directory and social media previews. If your work is visibly high quality but your photo doesn't do it justice I won't exclude you from the market but may not be able to use it for promotional purposes. If you send me photos which are essentially a jumble of things on a stall and it's not really clear what you make or how you make it this is when your application will be declined. 

One of the main reasons I am unable to accept an application is duplication. 

I may, for example, have 2 soap stalls at a market, but only when the range of products is significantly different from one another, thus appealing to different audiences. I am not looking for vendors that sell 'handmade' goods that they have purchased from a wholesaler. Many of the mass produced gift items we see will have been 'handmade' or 'hand finished' at some point in the manufacturing process but please understand this is not the same as making something yourself. 

Finally, please be assured that I choose vendors who run their businesses to make a profit. As talented as hobbyists may be I recognise that it is impossible for designers and makers to make a living when someone else is selling to cover 'materials only'.